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Intro to Buddhism. Bill Stauffer, The Greater Discourse to Malunkyaputta (# 64 from the Buddha's Middle Length Discourses) (10.23.2011)

From our ongoing Intro to Buddhism series. Bill Stauffer writes, "In this teaching the Buddha talks to his monk Malyunkyaputta about the five lower fetters which keep us bound to rebirth in the sense realm.  The five fetters are self-view, doubt, attachment to rites and rituals, sense desires, and ill will. The Buddha tells Malunkyaputta that these 5 fetters can only be completely cut by wisdom, and then goes on to describe how to recognize wisdom when it begins to arise in meditation. This teaching is related to the teaching of the Heart Sutra. It may allow you to understand the Heart Sutra in a new way." Includes questions and answers, though apologies if the questions are difficult to hear on this recording.

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Sunday Morning Sangha, Ven. Losang Samten. Joy. Silent Meditation, Chanting and Tara (10.16.2011)

A dharma talk about ... joy; Prayer of Refuge and Bodhicitta and The Four Immeasurable Thoughts; Homage to Green Tara, the Eight Profound Essences; instruction on "shamatha" ('no thoughts') meditation, and on meditation following the breath, then ten minutes, silent meditation.  After the break: a talk about mantra, and different ways of chanting mantra; oral transmission and chant of Tara mantra, OM TARE TUTARE TURE SOHA (10 mins.), Closing Prayers, and, Patience.  (The text of both Tara practices above can found on the Prayers and Practices pages here on the website.)

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Introduction to the Buddhist Path: The Four Tenets; Homage to Manjushri. Ven. Losang Samten (10.16.2011)

After the Buddha reached enlightenment in Bodhgaya, he taught many levels of teachings on how to overcome suffering.  From several of these teachings arose the four Buddhist Tenets, or codes - sometimes also referred to as schools.  They are: Vaibhasika, Sautrantika, Madhyamika and Cittamatra.  It is an expansive topic, and the subject of many books and commentaries.  In this hour, Ven. Losang provides a brief introduction.  First, however, a practice on the Buddha Manjushri, to help increase wisdom, recited here both in English and in Tibetan.  The first 20 minutes are the practice itself, followed by a teaching on the meaning of the words, and their Tibetan pronunciation.  This is followed by questions and answers about this practice, about the tradition of oral transmission, and about the benefits of reading practices and texts in Sanskrit, or Tibetan, as compared with English. Next, a discussion about the Buddha's teaching on Patience, found at the top of the pdf file on the Four Buddhist Tenets, below. And finally: a teaching on the Four Buddhist Tenets.  The text of the Manjushri practice recited here can be downloaded for free on the Prayers and Practices page here on our website.

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Introduction to the Buddhist Path: The Four Tenets, The Three Baskets (10.16.2011)

After the Buddha reached enlightenment in Bodhgaya, he taught many levels of teachings on how to overcome suffering. From several of these teachings arose the four Buddhist Tenets, or codes - sometimes also referred to as schools. They are: Vaibhasika, Sautrantika, Madhyamika and Cittamatra. These can further be divided into two categories, with Vaibhasika and Sautrantika being seen as Hinayana tenets and Madhyamika and Cittamatra being Mahayana tenets.  This distinction is based on the view of emptiness presented by the tenets, as well as the literal or interpretive understanding of the teachings of the Buddha. It is an expansive topic, and the subject of many books and commentaries.  This two page summary provides an overview, as well as an overview of the class that follows, on the Three Baskets, and also accompanies the audio recording from our classes on both subjects, above.

Introduction to the Buddhist Path: The Three Vehicles (10.9.2011)

In Buddhism, there exist two main yanas (vehicles), which may also be understood as traditions, or levels of practice: the Hinayana and Mahayana traditions, with the Mahayana itself then comprised of two further levels, the Bodhisattvayana and Vajrayana levels.  While all three yanas are comprised of the same core elements, they define, or perceive these core elements, differently.  In this first of offering in our Introduction to the Buddhist Path series, Ven. Losang Samten provides an overview of each vehicle, its fundamental characteristics, and how the three relate to each other. Written by Ven. Losang to accompany this teaching is the pdf file that you can download for free, just below this entry.  Manjushri image www.himalayanart.org #90181 Copyright © 2011 Shelley and Donald Rubin Foundation.

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Introduction to the Buddhist Path: The Three Vehicles (pdf file)

In Buddhism, there exist two main yanas (vehicles), which may also be understood as traditions, or levels of practice: Hinayana and Mahayana vehicles, with the Mahayana itself then comprised of two further levels, the Bodhisattvayana and Vajrayana levels.  While all three yanas are comprised of the same core elements, they define, or perceive these core elements, differently. In this two page summary, written to accompany his Introduction to the Buddhist Path series, Ven. Losang provides an overview of the three vehicles, how they relate to each other, and their fundamental characteristics from the point of view of someone interested in or on the Buddhist path.  This file goes with Losang la's teaching at our center, above.  (Manjushri image www.himalayanart.org #90181 Copyright © 2011 Shelley and Donald Rubin Foundation)

A Teaching on The Heart Sutra, part 1, Atul Govil. TBC Introduction to Buddhism Series (8.7.2011)

Part one of a two part teaching by Senior Teaching Student, Atul Govil, on The Sutra of the Heart of Transcendent Knowledge, better known simply as The Heart Sutra, and the central teaching text of Mahayana Buddhism. Also prepared in coordination with these talks is the chart below ("Developing Mindfulness ... "), which may be downloaded as a pdf file.  Please check back later when we hope to update this summary.  Thanks.

 

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Developing Mindfulness through Understanding the Senses (The Deconstruction of Self and Phenomena). A Table, prepared by Atul Govil.

Sentient beings act based on knowledge.  There are two kinds of knowledge: perceived and inferred. Perceived knowledge is caused by the sense conciousness, of which there are six, when the sense organ apprehends the appropriate object.  Inferred knowledge is created in the mind on the basis of perceived knowledge.  Actions of sentient baings are then externally manifest in the activity of their body, speech and mind.  These actions also leave imprints in the conciousness of sentient beings.  These imprints condition the future behavior of sentient beings in this lifetime (gross imprints) and in future lifetimes (subtle imprints).  - Our thanks to Senior Teaching Student, Atul Govil, for preparing this table, in conjunction with his dharma talks on The Heart Sutra, 8/7/11 and 9/18/11.

 

The Heart Sutra, part 2, Atul Govil. TBC Introduction to Buddhism Series (9.18.2011)

The second part of an insightful and deeply considered two part teaching from Senior Teaching Student, Atul Govil. The Sutra of the Heart of Transcendent Knowledge, better known simply as The Heart Sutra, is the central teaching text of Mahayana Buddhism.  Also referred to is the chart above ("Developing Mindfulness ... ") which may be downloaded for free.  Please check back soon when we will update this summary.

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Sunday Morning Sangha, Ven. Losang Samten Rinpoche, The Four Immeasurable Thoughts, A Meditation. Sept. 11, 2011

Ven. Losang Samten.  Prayer of Refuge and Bodhicitta, The Four Immeasurable Thoughts, and a meditation.  (This was followed by a Panden Lhamo Tea Ceremony.)

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