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Introduction to the Buddhist Path: The Five Dhyana Buddhas (Class #6 11.27.2011) Ven. Losang Samten.

The sixth of Rinpoche's initial dharma classes, Introduction to the Buddhist Path, given November 27, 2011.  The five Dhyana Buddhas play an important role in Buddhist Tantra.  Each relates in a particular way to the five aggregates (form, feeling, perception, formation, and consciousness), the purification of the five poisons (ignorance, negative pride and miserliness, attachment, jealousy, and anger/hatred) and transforming the five aggregates to achieve various aspects of wisdom. Thus, the five wisdoms, the five aggregates and the five poisons, the five symbols, five colors, and five syllables are all represented by the five Dhyana Buddhas and found within each mandala.  Every living being contains five contaminated aggregates, and through the practice of Tantra, these aggregates are purified (become uncontaminated), increasingly reflecting the enlightened qualities of the Dhyana Buddhas.  This teachings goes with the downloadable pdf, below.

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Introduction to the Buddhist Path: The Five Dhyana Buddhas (pdf)

The five Dhyana Buddhas play an important role in Buddhist Tantra, especially in relation to the creation of sacred mandalas.  Each relates in a particular way to the five aggregates (form, feeling, perception, formation, and consciousness), the purification of the five poisons (ignorance, negative pride and miserliness, attachment, jealousy, and anger/hatred) and transforming the five aggregates to achieve various aspects of wisdom. Thus, the five wisdoms, the five aggregates and the five poisons, the five symbols, five colors, and five syllables are all represented by the five Dhyana Buddhas and found within each mandala.  Every living being contains five contaminated aggregates, and through the practice of Tantra, these aggregates are purified (become uncontaminated), increasingly reflecting the enlightened qualities of the Dhyana Buddhas.  This handout accompanies Rinpoche's talk on Sunday, Nov. 27, as part of his series, Introduction to the Buddhist Path.

Sunday Morning Sangha, Ven. Losang Samten (11.20.2011) Chanting, Meditation, for all living beings.

Sunday morning meditation practice.  Chanting of Om Mani Peme Hung; Prayer of Refuge and Bodhicitta; guided meditation on the Four Immeasurable Thoughts, for all living beings; Shamatha "no thoughts" meditation; Padmasambhava Guru Yoga; and a brief discussion, Introduction to Tantra, from the class earlier in the morning.  Wishes of peace and happiness, of thanks, and of giving, to all this holiday.

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Sunday Morning Sangha, Ven. Losang Samten, Shamatha Silent Meditation and Green Tara meditation (11.13.2011)

Our regular Sunday morning meditation gathering, on a colorful and balmy autumn morning. Prayer of Refuge and Bodhicitta, and the Four Immeasurable Thoughts; Shamatha silent meditation (about 10 minutes), and a meditation with visualization, on Green Tara; followed by a short summary of the class from earlier that morning on the Five Paths.

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Introduction to the Buddhist Path: Introduction to Tantra (11.20.2011) Ven. Losang Samten

Buddhist Tantra is the most advanced level practice in Buddhism. There are numerous differences between Sutrayana and Tantra, one of the primary ones being that Tantra emphasizes the use of very subtle energies of the mind, of wind, and of the channels. Tantra also requires a strong foundation in Buddhist practice.  In our culture, the practice or meaning of Tantra is often misunderstood, or misrepresented. In this fifth offering in Rinpoche's six classes entitled, Introduction to the Buddhist Path, Rinpoche explains the distiguishing characteristics of Tantra, including the the four types of tantra, its four enlightened qualities, the essential practices and foundations before engaging in the practice, and an overview of the two levels of practice: generation stage and completion stage.  As with each of these classes, the hour begins with a short practice on Manjushri, the Buddha of wisdom. This talk goes with the pdf handout, just below.

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Introduction to the Buddhist Path: Introduction to Tantra (pdf)

Buddhist Tantra is the most advanced level practice in Buddhism. There are numerous differences between Sutrayana and Tantra, one of the primary ones being that Tantra emphasizes the use of very subtle energies of the mind, of wind, and of the channels. In our culture, the practice or meaning of Tantra is often misunderstood, or misrepresented. In this two and a half page summary, Ven. Losang addresses the distiguishing characteristics of tantra, including the the four types of tantra, its four enlightened qualities, the essential practices and foundations before engaging in the practice, and an overview of the two levels of practice: generation stage and completion stage. 

 

Introduction to the Buddhist Path: The Five Paths (11.13.2011) Ven. Losang Samten

In Buddhism, there are Five Paths that describe where a person finds him/herself on the Stages of the Path to Nirvana or Enlightenment. The five paths include, or are named: Path of Accumulation (Tsog lam); Path of Preparation (Jor lam); Path of Seeing (Tong lam); Path of Meditation (Gom lam); and Path of No More Learning (Me lhop lam).  Each has its own distinct and well defined characteristics. In this fourth offering in Venerable Losang's set of teachings, Introduction to the Buddhist Path, Losang La provides a brief and yet remarkably succinct introduction to the study of a lifetime - if not several.  Please see below for the written summary in pdf format that accompanies this talk.  As with each of the classes in this series, the teaching follows a short practice on Manjushri, the Buddha of wisdom.

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Introduction to the Buddhist Path: The Five Paths (pdf)

In Buddhism, there are Five Paths that outline or describe where a person finds him/herself on the Stages of the Path to Nirvana or Enlightenment. The five paths include, or are named: Path of Accumulation (Tsog lam); Path of Preparation (Jor lam); Path of Seeing (Tong lam); Path of Meditation (Gom lam); and Path of No More Learning (Me lhop lam).  Each has its own distinct and well defined characteristics. In this fourth offering in Venerable Losang's set of teachings, Introduction to the Buddhist Path, Losang La provides a brief and yet remarkably far reaching introduction to the study of a lifetime - if not several lifetimes.  This pdf file also accompanies Ven. Losang's Sunday, Nov. 13th talk on this topic, above.

Sunday Morning Sangha, Ven. Losang Samten. (10.30.2011) Tibetan Buddhism.

From our Sunday morning gathering.  First on this recording, about a minute of silent meditation that followed a practice on Green Tara.  Then, Green Tara mantra (about 15 minutes), Eight Verses for Training the Mind, and a Vajrayana guided meditation to purify body, speech and mind, and to remove the Three Poisons, and especially ignorance, anger, greed, and our negative emotions.  Dedication prayers and a talk by Ven. Losang about Tibetan Buddhism: the monkey and the horse, establishing a daily practice, and why it can all seem so complicated sometimes.  Finally, a look at the week ahead.  (For more on that: www.sama-art.org/ex_ev/loretto.htm )

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Introduction to the Buddhist Path: The Four Tenets, The Three Baskets (10.30.2011)

The teachings of the Buddha can be divided into what are commonly referred to as the three baskets: morality (moral discipline of body, speech and mind), concentration (building the focus in the mind, and wisdom (seeing the true nature of reality).  Please see (and feel free to download) also the two page overview (pdf) written by Ven. Losang regarding both of these topics, just a few entries below this one.

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